Fall 2019

Edited by Nicholas Pevzner & Stephanie Carlisle

Infrastructure is always political, and energy transitions have always been contested, pitting established players against upstart technologies and new coalitions. How can a radical reimagining of energy infrastructure create opportunities for an inclusive and participatory conversation about climate change and social justice? Who has the power to talk about infrastructure, and who gets left out?
Introduction: Power
Community Power As Provocation: Local Control For Resilience And Equity
Our Energy For Our Country
Speculative Designs For Energy Democracy
The TVA, Fuzzy Spaces Of Power, And Other Purposes
The Missouri River Basin: Water, Power, Decolonization, And Design
Power Plant Power
Arctic Present: The Case Of Teriberka
Coal Ash Wastescapes: The Byproduct Of Our Coal-Fired Power Dependency
Biomass For All: Designing An Inclusive Biomass Infrastructure
China’s Giant Transmission Grid Could Be The Key To Cutting Climate Emissions
2050 – An Energetic Odyssey: Persuasion By Collective Immersion
The Blue Lagoon: From Waste Commons To Landscape Commodity
Territory Of Extraction: The Crude North
Daylighting Conflict: Board Games As Decision-Making Tools

Popular

    The Performative Ground: Rediscovering The Deep Section

    by Stephanie Carlisle and Nicholas Pevzner

    The landscape we see happens above ground, yet much of its true intelligence lies beneath the surface.

    Information Anxiety: Towards Understanding

    by Author .

    Communication is equivocal. We are limited by a language where words may mean one thing to one person and quite something else to another. The founder of TED conferences, Richard Saul Wurman examines the architecture of communication.

    Landscape Urbanism: Definitions & Trajectory

    by Christopher Gray

    Long described as an “emerging” practice, landscape urbanism—with all of its ambiguity and complexity—has in fact already emerged and represents a significant 21st century design and planning ethos.

    Power Plant Power

    by Salvador Lindquist and Eric Minton

    Scattered throughout Detroit are relics of the city’s industrial production, along with the old generators of power for that industry. Power Plant Power investigates Detroit through the lens of energy production, its subsequent decline, and new futures of alternative modes and dynamics of power.

    Introduction: Extraction

    by Stephanie Carlisle and Nicholas Pevzner

    Extraction sustains our society. The economic value of raw materials regularly outweighs concerns about the practices and processes required to bring them to market. But have we really grappled with the complex systems that landscapes of extraction expose?

    Exhibit: Lebbeus Woods at The Drawing Center

    by Stephanie Carlisle and Nicholas Pevzner

    LEBBEUS WOODS, ARCHITECT, on exhibit at The Drawing Center in New York, traces the career of Lebbeus Woods, a visionary architect whose responses to the sites of trauma have given us haunting designs — intricate, beautiful, full of memory, and ultimately optimistic.

    The Hole World: Scales and Spaces of Extraction

    by Gavin Bridge

    Landscapes of energy extraction are portals, wormholes between two worlds in which time and space work differently.

    Introduction: Rethinking Infrastructure

    by Stephanie Carlisle and Nicholas Pevzner

    As landscape advocates and practitioners argue for a more central role in the design of cities, many are starting to ask, how can a focus on landscape transform traditional conceptions of infrastructure? Can we rethink how infrastructure of the next century is imagined and built?

    Changing The Land: Integrating Ecological Science With Design

    by Lea Johnson

    Humanity is very good at taking things apart. We have elaborate machinery and centuries of experience in extracting what we need and making messes as we go.

    Skeleton Forms: The Architecture of Infrastructure

    by Laila Seewang

    What determines the boundary of an infrastructural project? How does it overlap with other discrete projects and what part of the larger ‘network’ is adopted into the urban fragment?