Fall 2019

Edited by Nicholas Pevzner & Stephanie Carlisle

Infrastructure is always political, and energy transitions have always been contested, pitting established players against upstart technologies and new coalitions. How can a radical reimagining of energy infrastructure create opportunities for an inclusive and participatory conversation about climate change and social justice? Who has the power to talk about infrastructure, and who gets left out?
Introduction: Power
Community Power As Provocation: Local Control For Resilience And Equity
Our Energy For Our Country
Speculative Designs For Energy Democracy
The TVA, Fuzzy Spaces Of Power, And Other Purposes
The Missouri River Basin: Water, Power, Decolonization, And Design
Power Plant Power
Arctic Present: The Case Of Teriberka
Coal Ash Wastescapes: The Byproduct Of Our Coal-Fired Power Dependency
Biomass For All: Designing An Inclusive Biomass Infrastructure
China’s Giant Transmission Grid Could Be The Key To Cutting Climate Emissions
2050 – An Energetic Odyssey: Persuasion By Collective Immersion
The Blue Lagoon: From Waste Commons To Landscape Commodity
Territory Of Extraction: The Crude North
Daylighting Conflict: Board Games As Decision-Making Tools

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    The Performative Ground: Rediscovering The Deep Section

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    The Hole World: Scales and Spaces of Extraction

    by Gavin Bridge

    Landscapes of energy extraction are portals, wormholes between two worlds in which time and space work differently.

    Landscape Urbanism: Definitions & Trajectory

    by Christopher Gray

    Long described as an “emerging” practice, landscape urbanism—with all of its ambiguity and complexity—has in fact already emerged and represents a significant 21st century design and planning ethos.

    Power

    by Nicholas Pevzner & Stephanie Carlisle

    Infrastructure is always political, and energy transitions have always been contested, pitting established players against upstart technologies and new coalitions. How can a radical reimagining of energy infrastructure create opportunities for an inclusive and participatory conversation about climate change and social justice? Who has the power to talk about infrastructure, and who gets left out?

    Made in Australia: The Future of Australian Cities

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    The Australian population is increasing at a rate of one person every 84 seconds. Taking population growth seriously means planning for an extra 40 million Australians by century’s end.

    Aqueous Ecologies: Parametric Aquaculture and Urbanism

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    Aqueous Ecologies imagines a future in which new ecologies, economies, and cultural identities of the city are intertwined with landscape-based solutions for wastewater management and treatment.

    Introduction: Building the Urban Forest

    by Stephanie Carlisle, Nicholas Pevzner & Max Piana

    The idea of the forest carries deep cultural significance. What do we know about how the urban forest works — as living machine, as novel ecosystem, as a site for ecosystem services, and as a spatially and culturally rich landscape?

    Changing The Land: Integrating Ecological Science With Design

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    West 8 Airport Landscape: Schiphol

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    To make sense of the fragmented territory of an ever-expanding Airport, West 8 planted a bombardment of trees. With hundreds, sometimes thousands at the same time, it was a strategy that worked everywhere.